Of all the holidays through out the year, Memorial weekend is the one that brings most people back to their families whether living or deceased. Its mostly love of family — or perhaps guilt for some reason or resurrecting memories of events in the past — whatever the reason, flowers are deposited on the graves of the departed.

Of all the holidays through out the year, Memorial weekend is the one that brings most people back to their families whether living or deceased. Its mostly love of family — or perhaps guilt for some reason or resurrecting memories of events in the past — whatever the reason, flowers are deposited on the graves of the departed.


In past years when Adam was mowing Sacred Heart Cemetery, we had pleasant meetings with many people who had moved away but came to plant flowers. Strolling through a cemetery is like reading a history book. Each and every name resurrects a picture of that person and the memory of their life in the community. Last Saturday, I had the pleasure of meeting Susan Malter, now from North Carolina, who made the trip to plant flowers on her parents, Steve and Bettie Malter’s graves.


Last week while weeding the flowers along the walk, a pickup truck stopped and, to my surprise, Mike Bricks from Tennessee informed me he reads my column every week. He was here to attend his daughter’s graduation ceremonies in Batavia. Its a small world.


Trust in the Lives of Older Women is a program sponsored by the Office of the Aging. The local group meets at the Wayland Library twice a month on Wednesdays headed by Marian Crawford. The next meeting is at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 22. The guest speaker is Maxine Long, who will talk about “story teller.” She might inspire some of you to write about your childhood or special events that happened to you or memories from the past.


These stories will eventually be compiled and published in book form so that it will be a testimony to our past for this generation and the next to read. We’ve already experienced major changes in our lives from the time we were young and we know more will occur.


You are encouraged to come and bring a friend.


I’d be remiss in not mentioning the terrible tornado in Joplin, Mo. last week. Such a tragedy that affected thousands of people. We were so thankful to hear that our grandson and his wife were safe. They had lived in Joplin when they first went to Missouri but had moved several months ago. Sara Didas received word her sister was injured when her house was destroyed. Bob and Sara’s two sons flew out to check on her and help with insurance settlement and seeing what was salvageable from her house. It’s heart-warming to hear that so many volunteers have turned out to help.


This is the weekend for sign-up for the Pie and Cake Baking Contest June 11 at the Wayland Museum. Check in 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday, 2–4 p.m. Sunday or 10 a.m. – noon Monday. Try your hand at winning some cash prizes.


Plans are underway for the second annual reunion for graduates from Wayland Highschool classes of 1960s and ‘70s at the Perkinsville Rod and Gun club in September. Your suggestions and help would be welcomed. Call Carol Mykel, 585-728-3668, and she’ll give you the time and place of next meeting.


The Perkinsville Rod and Gun Club is a beautiful spot for picnics and gatherings but without the income from trap shooting their expenses are increasing. Some of their supporters are hosting a penny social for the club on Monday, June 13, at the Perkinsville Fire Hall. Donations would be appreciated.


Tomorrow, Golden Agers gather for the first Friday Mass at 11:30 followed by dinner in the Parish Center.


Happy Anniversary to Bob and Bonnie Hughes, tomorrow, June 3.