Dr. Seuss is known for his books for children, but this one, which Seuss wrote to celebrate his 82nd birthday, is subtitled “A Book for Obsolete Children” and follows the adventures of an older man at an exotic geriatric clinic, where at the end, he is “properly pilled and properly billed.” This humorous look at aging is great medicine.

“You’re Only Old Once” by Dr. Seuss


Dr. Seuss is known for his books for children, but this one, which Seuss wrote to celebrate his 82nd birthday, is subtitled “A Book for Obsolete Children” and follows the adventures of an older man at an exotic geriatric clinic, where at the end, he is “properly pilled and properly billed.” This humorous look at aging is great medicine.


“Memories For My Grandchild” by Annie Decker and Nicole Stephenson


Themed chapters and a series of prompts make sharing a lifetime of memories easier, though filling up this journal is certainly an ambitious project. But once those chapters on travel, family, friends and romance are filled with pictures and personal recollections, it will make a perfect legacy gift.


“Grandloving: Making Memories With Your Grandchildren” by Sue Johnson, Julie Carlson and Elizabeth Bower


Generational gaps can be hard to overcome, especially when that gap encompasses two generations. But the gap can be much smaller when common ground is found, and this book is a guide to activities that can be enjoyed by grandparents and grandchildren alike. It’s gotten rave reviews from famous grandparents such as “Family Circus” creator Bill Keane.


“Long Distance Grandparenting: Connecting With Your Grandchildren from Afar” by Wilma Willis Gore


One of the joys of late life is having grandchildren whom you can spoil, then return to their parents at the end of the day. But how can you experience that joy when the grandparents or parents have moved away? Filled with advice and anecdotes, this book shows how active grandparents are forging bonds from miles away.


“101 Ways to Spoil Your Grandchild” by Vicki Lansky


Sure, you can buy them everything they want, let them eat candy for breakfast and take them out for pizza every visit. But that’s the easy, less rewarding way to spoil grandchildren. Instead, spoil them with attention: Create a secret handshake to share, or even just watch a sunset together.