Nunda’s quiet organic food manufacturing company will be expanding into Wyoming County, which could be step one in a number of other expansions for its nut butter and other products.

Nunda’s quiet organic food manufacturing company will be expanding into Wyoming County, which could be step one in a number of other expansions for its nut butter and other products.

Once Again Nut Butter signed a contract last month to rent 2,400 square feet of space in the former Champion Products in Perry, about half the space it has now in Nunda. The Perry location is to better handle the company’s shipping, receiving, refrigeration and storage. Once Again communications manager Gael Orr said the company first looked in Livingston County, but couldn’t find condusive space.

While all operations are still being conducted in Nunda, the new warehouse is expected to be in full swing in the next few months.

“This building we’re in right now is at capacity,” Orr explained.

Once things are operational in Perry, a new peanut butter jar line will be installed and locker rooms will be expanded in the Nunda facility. The Perry move has helped to facilitate room for these other expansions. In addition, the company also hopes to break ground on a new building next year, so that peanut products can be manufactured in a separate facility.

With peanut allergies being common, the ability to produce peanut products in a separate facility is, “something our customers are demanding,” Orr said.

In addition, the new facility would follow in the footsteps of the company's organic traditions in that it would incorporate green technology. To accommodate its growing demand, the company has hired 15 new employees so far this year. It isn’t expected that there will be new hires for the Perry warehouse, however. The plan for Perry is to move three current employees there, two of whom would have a shorter commute to work. The other would be driving truck from the Nunda location to the Perry location. In addition to the expansions and new hires, Once Again is also expecting to put a new truck on the road later this summer.

The only thing that could prevent the organic manufacturer from building its peanut facility is finding the right piece of real estate as well as the possibility of hydraulic fracturing taking place, which could jeapordize the company, as well as all other organic companies across the state, from remaining certified as an organic foods producer.