After a few days of upheaval, life has returned to normal in our small town. The roads are open and the fear of a few days ago has subsided. There are no visible reminders of the 20-hour police presence or near disaster that threatened to level an entire block. People are still talking about the incident and wondering how they became victims of what most perceive to be a big-town crime. Most are thankful that the situation was resolved without any loss of life or property damage, and some are damned angry that this happened in our town where so many people take for granted that we care about each other and respect each other’s rights.

After a few days of upheaval, life has returned to normal in our small town. The roads are open and the fear of a few days ago has subsided. There are no visible reminders of the 20-hour police presence or near disaster that threatened to level an entire block. People are still talking about the incident and wondering how they became victims of what most perceive to be a big-town crime. Most are thankful that the situation was resolved without any loss of life or property damage, and some are damned angry that this happened in our town where so many people take for granted that we care about each other and respect each other’s rights.

Two incidents in as many months have created a somewhat uneasy feeling that serious crime is not solely occurring in Rochester. The home invasion and now the manufacturing of pipe bombs and possession of chemicals capable of leveling a whole segment of the downtown area if handled improperly have left many residents wary.

It is time to become pro-active and become better educated in what is actually happening in our town. Visit the court and listen to the kinds of complaints Judge Haywood is dealing with on a regular basis, and you will discover it is not solely traffic complaints or dog leash violations. While we do not have the volume of crime that our larger cities and towns are dealing with regularly, there are serious offenses occurring here. Many of these crimes occur under the radar or are excused as being “just part of today’s society” and they will continue unless we start looking out for each other. Let’s see if we can come up with some viable solutions with our elected officials before more residents are victimized.

This is not a call for vigilantism, and I am certainly not advocating that all of us carry handguns, but I am suggesting that we work with our elected officials to see if there are acceptable ways to empower our residents to be more cognizant of what is and is not acceptable behavior. Just as TRIAD works with the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office and the Office for the Aging to protect our older, most vulnerable residents from criminal behavior, we need to work with our elected officials and law enforcement to see if we can empower younger residents and homeowners to be more aware of what is going on around them. This town will celebrate its bicentennial in three years and we want people to feel welcome here, but we do not want this town to be a magnet for criminal activities or a haven for criminals. Next time we may not escape serious injury or irreparable property damage.

Herb Tinney sent the following e-mail this week regarding the public hearing on the 2013 Moratorium on High-Volume Natural Gas Hydro—fracking in Springwater. The public hearing is scheduled for Monday, July 1, at 7:15 p.m. at the Town Hall, 8022 S. Main St (Rte 15) about a quarter mile from the intersection of U.S. Routes 15 and 15A. A reminder that U.S. Route 15A is under construction so you might want to find an alternate route to the Town Hall. You are strongly encouraged to attend, and to voice your comments regarding this increasingly important issue.

Jake Davis, Information Officer for the Livingston County American Legion sent a copy of a new law pertaining to cemeteries and the placement of flags on veterans’ graves. While there has never been an issue down here and the Springwater American Legion places flags in nine cemeteries, often with the help of cemetery association members, obviously there was a need for clarification someplace in the state. Here is the new law:
“Current law prohibits any town, cemetery association or ecclesiastical society from enacting bylaws restricting the placement of the flag of the United States on veterans’ graves from the Saturday before Memorial Day until the Monday after the Fourth of July. The new bill, recently signed into law would prohibit such restrictions starting from the Friday prior to Memorial Day. This was the first year volunteers were able to begin flag placement before the holiday weekend.”

Summer officially arrives at 1:04 a.m. on Friday, June 21. Are you a yard sale aficionado? If so, you will not want to miss the town-wide yard sale June 21-23 in Honeoye. The sale runs from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. each day. The quickest way I know to Honeoye without getting tangled up in the road construction is to take Canadice Lake Road north to U. S. Rte 20B, turn right at the stop sign and you are on the main thoroughfare into town.

Harvey Teed sent a note this week that he had learned the Springwater Transfer Station on Hudson Road will accept all types of recyclables every Saturday morning. This includes tin, glass, wood and paper.

Friday evening, Flag Day, members of Springwater American Legion Post 905 joined with members of Wayland American Legion Post 402 in a joint Flag Disposal Ceremony. Afterward, we greeted five of the 11 young men who are graduating from WCCS and joining the military. One student from Springwater, Levi Wormuth, is already in basic training in the Air Force, and another student from Springwater, Anthony Tedesco, was not present, but will soon join the Navy. Jeffrey Rossmann, who graduated in 2012 from WCCS and lives in Websters Crossing, will soon leave for the Marine Corps.

Other graduates from WCCS who are entering service are Tyler Brown, Army ROTC – SUNY Brockport; Charles Flagg, Jr. and Dylan Shaffer, Air Force; Connor Mark and Alex Pragle, Army; Brett Sawdey, Marines; Ryan Garrison, Navy; and Donald Cobb, National Guard. A nice dinner of Beef on Wick with salad and potatoes, and a wonderful dessert was served after the presentation.

Have a great week and be kind to one another!