Dansville High School returns to hybrid learning

High school students entered full remote learning last week to quell the impact of COVID-19

Staff reports
Dansville High School students returned to campus with in-person hybrid learning on Tuesday after some time away due to escalating COVID-19 cases and quarantines in the district.

DANSVILLE — Dansville High School students returned to campus with in-person hybrid learning on Tuesday after some time away due to escalating COVID-19 cases and quarantines in the district. 

The return to semi-normalcy capped off a whirlwind period for the district. High school students entered full remote learning last week to quell the impact of COVID-19. By mid-week, though, the district was notified that most of its food services staff had to be placed in quarantine due to potential COVID-19 exposure. Meanwhile, vaccinations became available for school employees across the state and locally in Livingston County as the state advanced to Phase 1B of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout plan. 

Through all the changes and uncertainty, the district stayed the course and was able to return students to in-person hybrid learning Tuesday. The break seemed to work; Dansville Superintendent Paul Alioto reported the district’s COVID-19 numbers stabilized in all its buildings. 

“The really good news is that the number of quarantines and positives is projected to drop significantly by Tuesday, Jan. 19 and drop even more on Wednesday as students and staff are released from quarantine,” Alioto said. 

The district projected 16 quarantined students and three employees at the primary school by Tuesday. Eight students and four employees were projected at the high school, with five students and one employee in quarantine at EBH elementary school. The ASAP program had two projected quarantines. Projections included four positive students and two employees at the high school, with one employee at EBH. 

“Livingston County and Dansville area positives dropped this week and with the vaccination rollout, I’m more optimistic than ever that good days are on the horizon,” said Alioto. “As long as we continue to protect one another and endure a little longer, local quarantines and positives will continue to drop and one day soon, we will begin the conversation about getting back to familiar routines and rights of passage for our students.” 

CNR tracks rise in COVID-19 cases

Elsewhere in Livingston County, the Livingston County Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation (CNR) is currently experiencing an uptick in COVID-19 cases among staff. 

The total number of COVID-19 positives among CNR staff is 25 at present. Additionally, there are five people out related to COVID-19 exposures and two out secondary to travel. This represents approximately 10% of the staff, comprised of both clinical and ancillary staff members. This percentage is slightly lower than the current community rate(s) of both the County and the Finger Lakes Region over the past 10 days.

All CNR staff members are tested two times per week and are screened on a daily basis. In the event of a positive test result, the employee is immediately removed from the schedule, and notifications are made to the state and local departments of health as well as resident / responsible parties.

Currently there are five residents in the Center that are COVID-19 positive. These residents are in the Center’s dedicated COVID-19 unit under quarantine. All residents in the quarantine area remain so for a minimal 21-day period, receive multiple COVID-19 PCR tests to ensure negativity, and must be symptom-free prior to transitioning into a long-term care neighborhood.

The resident vaccination acceptance rate – or those wishing to, and in fact taking the vaccine dose #1 – is around 92% and expected to climb higher during our second and third clinics on Jan. 27 and Feb. 17.

The CNR has had three unannounced New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) Infection Control surveys over the last eight weeks. The focus of these surveys is to ensure the CNR is compliant with state, federal, and infection prevention guidelines. The CNR was deemed to be in substantial compliance.

Protocols include enhanced utilization of N-95 respirators, KN-95’s in lieu of surgical masks, quarantine and isolation specific PPE, in concert with our aggressive infection prevention policies and procedures. 

“We would like to thank our amazing staff for their incredible work during this COVID-19 pandemic,” said Stephen Woodruff, Director of Long-Term Care at the CNR. “These folks are true health care heroes.”