And More! What a few warm, sunny days can do. Just the other day, I was only able to spot two Bloodroot emerging that were only a quarter inch in height. Today they are popping up by the hundreds and in one sunny spot one of them dared to bloom. These are mostly scattered throughout the back woods and number in the thousands. I also have a hundred of the exquisite double form resembling a small peony. Then a couple years ago I got a pink form that in bud has a nice soft pink tinge. My Spring Beauty started sending their thin grass-like leaves in December, but this past few weeks the patch got bigger and bigger. Today I found one plant that announced to me that Spring is truly here. I will be more convinced when they are covered with their soft pink flowers. The honors for the first of my native plants to bloom goes to my White Trout Lily. I only have one of the white form, but it will be followed soon by dozens of the more common Yellow Trout Lily. When I say dozen, I mean a dozen flowering plants. This is a plant that is shy about blooming. I will have many square yards of the forest floor covered with the green mottled leaves. Each year the roots go deeper and deeper until they too will bloom. Then in a couple months when the canopy fills in the foliage will disappear – one of our spring ephemerals.
Some of my other Ephemerals are now emerging. My two foliage look-a-likes; Dutchman’s Britches and Squirrel Corn, have emerged and will soon be in flower. In contrast to their delicate foliage, I spotted today emergent leaves of Virginia Bluebells. When these bloom it is a sight to see. I have one bank that is covered with the large foliage and the abundance of blue and pink flowers. Now I am working on another bank to repeat the sight, emulating how these plants occur in nature, forming large expanses.

And More! What a few warm, sunny days can do. Just the other day, I was only able to spot two Bloodroot emerging that were only a quarter inch in height. Today they are popping up by the hundreds and in one sunny spot one of them dared to bloom. These are mostly scattered throughout the back woods and number in the thousands. I also have a hundred of the exquisite double form resembling a small peony. Then a couple years ago I got a pink form that in bud has a nice soft pink tinge. My Spring Beauty started sending their thin grass-like leaves in December, but this past few weeks the patch got bigger and bigger. Today I found one plant that announced to me that Spring is truly here. I will be more convinced when they are covered with their soft pink flowers. The honors for the first of my native plants to bloom goes to my White Trout Lily. I only have one of the white form, but it will be followed soon by dozens of the more common Yellow Trout Lily. When I say dozen, I mean a dozen flowering plants. This is a plant that is shy about blooming. I will have many square yards of the forest floor covered with the green mottled leaves. Each year the roots go deeper and deeper until they too will bloom. Then in a couple months when the canopy fills in the foliage will disappear – one of our spring ephemerals. Some of my other Ephemerals are now emerging. My two foliage look-a-likes; Dutchman’s Britches and Squirrel Corn, have emerged and will soon be in flower. In contrast to their delicate foliage, I spotted today emergent leaves of Virginia Bluebells. When these bloom it is a sight to see. I have one bank that is covered with the large foliage and the abundance of blue and pink flowers. Now I am working on another bank to repeat the sight, emulating how these plants occur in nature, forming large expanses.