Out at the end of the driveway that gets a lot of afternoon sun, Canada goldenrod is blooming. This is the same goldenrod that you see along the roadsides that form large expanses of yellow seas. In the shadier spots the zig-zag goldenrod predominates. This was indigenous on our lot in scattered locations. But after all these years it has decided it really likes it and is spreading around with abandon. The blue-stemmed goldenrod is another that thrives and blooms in less than full sun. These are the two most commonly available species that do not require full sun to grow and flower. Just a few more native wildflowers to add to my woodland.

Then, of course, there are the asters. The taxonomists have been at work so many of them have been removed from the genus Asteracea, but to me and other gardeners they will always be asters in spite of the taxonomists. The first of these to bloom, now past, is the white wood aster. In full bloom now is the big-leaf aster towering four feet. This is easily identified by its “big leaves”. Another is the blue wood aster which is another aster that is readily identified. I have been trying to grow the New England aster out by my mail box. It grows, but is reluctant to bloom.

One plant that I got this year is mist flower, a cousin of Joe Pye weed. The tiny “misty” flowers are a soft blue. I have been buying some grasses and sedges lately and one of the grasses is in full bloom. It grows about three feet tall, is starting to spread and will be planted in other locations. I have a sedge in my front bed and was delighted to see a spike of intense purple flowers, albeit only one.

If you have a shady spot, consider Corydalis lutea (yellow) and Corydalis ochreleuca (white) for bloom from spring into fall. Both are still in bloom now and will be in bloom four to six weeks hence.

Out at the end of the driveway that gets a lot of afternoon sun, Canada goldenrod is blooming. This is the same goldenrod that you see along the roadsides that form large expanses of yellow seas. In the shadier spots the zig-zag goldenrod predominates. This was indigenous on our lot in scattered locations. But after all these years it has decided it really likes it and is spreading around with abandon. The blue-stemmed goldenrod is another that thrives and blooms in less than full sun. These are the two most commonly available species that do not require full sun to grow and flower. Just a few more native wildflowers to add to my woodland. Then, of course, there are the asters. The taxonomists have been at work so many of them have been removed from the genus Asteracea, but to me and other gardeners they will always be asters in spite of the taxonomists. The first of these to bloom, now past, is the white wood aster. In full bloom now is the big-leaf aster towering four feet. This is easily identified by its “big leaves”. Another is the blue wood aster which is another aster that is readily identified. I have been trying to grow the New England aster out by my mail box. It grows, but is reluctant to bloom. One plant that I got this year is mist flower, a cousin of Joe Pye weed. The tiny “misty” flowers are a soft blue. I have been buying some grasses and sedges lately and one of the grasses is in full bloom. It grows about three feet tall, is starting to spread and will be planted in other locations. I have a sedge in my front bed and was delighted to see a spike of intense purple flowers, albeit only one. If you have a shady spot, consider Corydalis lutea (yellow) and Corydalis ochreleuca (white) for bloom from spring into fall. Both are still in bloom now and will be in bloom four to six weeks hence.