What’s Up, Doc?

I went around the garden yesterday, with the daughter of a friend, who is working on a Girl Scout project, photographing both native and non-native blooms in the garden. The snowdrops and the yellow aconites were up in profusion as were the cyclamen at the base of my wall. Only a few of the Chiondoxa were in bloom, but their presence was everywhere, Accommodatingly, one of my heaths had come in to bloom with its small pink bells. A dozen of the Hellebores were flowering with blooms of white to pink to a dark, dark purple. (It will soon be time to cut off last year’s foliage to allow for the bright green new leaves.) Some of the toad trilliums are up with their mottled leaves. I cleared away some leaf mulch from below the pool and lo and behold, my snow trillium, Trillium nivale, was in bloom. It is a tiny trillium with leaves and petals barely 0.2 inches in size. More and more spring beauty leaves are appearing and joining them are the ferny leaves of bleeding heart. Corydalis solida is popping up hither and yon and in one spot the yellow bulbs are exposed due to frost heaving. Another spreader is Italian arum, a relative of our jack-in-the-pulpit. Down in the back woods there are ramp leaves coming up in droves. A little further on more of the arum and surprise! surprise!, a trout lily, Erythronium albidum, in bloom. I forgot I had transplanted it here last year. In another week or so it will be joined by the yellow trout lily and soon thereafter the west coast and European trout lilies.

I went around this morning and more of the Chiondoxa were in bloom and there were leaves everywhere, in the back woods as well as the front woods and the lawn. spotted more of the toad trilliums up. I used to have lots of crocuses, but I suspect they provided a feast for my resident chipmunks. The ones I have are growing in most unlikely sites, again thanks to the chipmunks. In the spot where the spring beauty is growing more of the toad trilliums are up. I looked for the Dutchman’s britches, but found no sign of them. What I did find was one Virginia bluebell up.
In the cracks of my flagstone patio there are signs of growth on bloodroot.

I also found to my dismay dozens of plants of the dreaded alien invader, garlic mustard. I disturbed this area two years ago and the garlic mustard took full advantage. I expect occasional plants popping up because my neighbors’ lots are infested with it. But I did not expect to see it in such profusion.

What’s Up, Doc? I went around the garden yesterday, with the daughter of a friend, who is working on a Girl Scout project, photographing both native and non-native blooms in the garden. The snowdrops and the yellow aconites were up in profusion as were the cyclamen at the base of my wall. Only a few of the Chiondoxa were in bloom, but their presence was everywhere, Accommodatingly, one of my heaths had come in to bloom with its small pink bells. A dozen of the Hellebores were flowering with blooms of white to pink to a dark, dark purple. (It will soon be time to cut off last year’s foliage to allow for the bright green new leaves.) Some of the toad trilliums are up with their mottled leaves. I cleared away some leaf mulch from below the pool and lo and behold, my snow trillium, Trillium nivale, was in bloom. It is a tiny trillium with leaves and petals barely 0.2 inches in size. More and more spring beauty leaves are appearing and joining them are the ferny leaves of bleeding heart. Corydalis solida is popping up hither and yon and in one spot the yellow bulbs are exposed due to frost heaving. Another spreader is Italian arum, a relative of our jack-in-the-pulpit. Down in the back woods there are ramp leaves coming up in droves. A little further on more of the arum and surprise! surprise!, a trout lily, Erythronium albidum, in bloom. I forgot I had transplanted it here last year. In another week or so it will be joined by the yellow trout lily and soon thereafter the west coast and European trout lilies. I went around this morning and more of the Chiondoxa were in bloom and there were leaves everywhere, in the back woods as well as the front woods and the lawn. spotted more of the toad trilliums up. I used to have lots of crocuses, but I suspect they provided a feast for my resident chipmunks. The ones I have are growing in most unlikely sites, again thanks to the chipmunks. In the spot where the spring beauty is growing more of the toad trilliums are up. I looked for the Dutchman’s britches, but found no sign of them. What I did find was one Virginia bluebell up. In the cracks of my flagstone patio there are signs of growth on bloodroot. I also found to my dismay dozens of plants of the dreaded alien invader, garlic mustard. I disturbed this area two years ago and the garlic mustard took full advantage. I expect occasional plants popping up because my neighbors’ lots are infested with it. But I did not expect to see it in such profusion.