It doesn’t seem necessary to remind readers this Monday is Memorial Day which is the day set aside to honor the men and women who have died to give us the freedoms we enjoy today.

It doesn’t seem necessary to remind readers this Monday is Memorial Day which is the day set aside to honor the men and women who have died to give us the freedoms we enjoy today.
Remember also the men and women who were wounded and are facing life-altering physical difficulties. The brief time marching to the cemetery and listening to the prayers and speeches offered are the least we can do to show our respect and appreciation.
The Perkinsville parade is 10 a.m., followed by the one in Wayland at 11.
VOLUNTEERS! The world is a better place because of them. Sacred Heart Church has been blessed with volunteers for years with every generation providing them.
From my early recollection, Frank Morsch was the janitor in the 1940s and mowing the grounds and cemetery was part of his job. I would consider him a volunteer since his salary was meager at that time.
The priests usually took charge of selling cemetery sites until Father arrived in 1954. Since Tuite’s health was not the best, Jack Malter took charge of the cemetery books and the grounds with the help of Adam Engel and Arthur (Buddy) Malter, who mowed nights and weekends. Adam took over from Jack and arranged the sale of the sites and the mowing for 27 years. Steve and Bettie Malter stepped in as volunteers about 1991 to carry on the mowing and record keeping until Steve’s sudden death in 2004. Once again, another volunteer came forth, Steve’s brother, John, who took over  with the help of his sister Sally Higgenbotham and brother-in-law, Leonard Wager. During his tenure, John arranged maintenance on many old monuments that needed leveling. He retired last year and turned the books over to Jerry Kiesl, who along with Sally, her husband, Bud, and Lenny continue to keep the park and cemetery in tiptop shape with weekly weed whacking and keeping the pine cones and broken branches picked up.
A BIG thank you to those volunteers.
Ladies; remember when you wore an apron doing your cooking and cleaning? What happened to those aprons?
We are still cooking and cleaning but don’t feel the need for an apron. Perhaps the change took place when ladies started wearing slacks during World War II. (I still have one hanging on the hook, handy to grab when I have a Sunday dress on and get ready to cook dinner) The Historical Society plans on writing an article on aprons and would appreciate any and all stories about your apron experience. Mail them to the Society, Box 494, Wayland, NY?14572.
Another reminder is the garden tour and pie contest at the Wayland Historical Society June 12. Contestants must pick up pie tins and register either June 4, 5, or 6 at the museum from 2 to 4 p.m. Don’t hesitate gals, step right up and show your stuff.
Sunday’s winner of the 50-week club at the Perkinsville Fire Hall was Catherine Rauber. Happy birthday greetings to Bonnie Hughes June 1.
“People will judge you by your actions as well as your intentions – hard boiled eggs have a heart of gold, too.”