An item scheduled to be cut may have hope.


In regular session Tuesday night, the Dansville Central School Board of Education informally agreed that it would like to see a full-day kindergarten restored into the 2011–12 budget plan as  the best way to expend a recently-made available $114,090.


This “extra” money are  funds that can be placed back into the budget after the combined retirements and proposed cuts for Proposition 1 became greater than the budget gap. The latest cuts and retirement figures are now at $3,035,319. The gap is $2,921,229.

An item scheduled to be cut may have hope.


In regular session Tuesday night, the Dansville Central School Board of Education informally agreed that it would like to see a full-day kindergarten restored into the 2011–12 budget plan as  the best way to expend a recently-made available $114,090.


This “extra” money are  funds that can be placed back into the budget after the combined retirements and proposed cuts for Proposition 1 became greater than the budget gap. The latest cuts and retirement figures are now at $3,035,319. The gap is $2,921,229.


Regarding expending the $114,090 to restore  full-day kindergarten, superintendent Paul Alioto said, “If we could do anything, if we could do only one thing, that would be it,” he suggested.


Restoring full-day kindergarten would come at a cost of $159,928 including staff benefits.


To make up for this extra expense, the board is mulling changing the number of kindergarten classes from six to five.


For Proposition 2, the latest numbers call for a total athletic budget of $444,909 and a co-curricular budget of $54,427. Both suffered recent cuts totalling $126,024.


If both propositions pass, taxpayers would be looking at a 9 percent increase in their tax levy. If only Proposition 1 passes, it would be a 2 percent levy, but sports and co-curricular activities would be lost.


Business manager Kristen Barret presented to the board the district’s 2011–12 revenues, totalling $26,425,589 for 2011–12, a loss of $1,273,925 from the current year.


The district’s projected overall reserves at the end of this year is estimated to be $4.7 million, far lower than where it should be – at about 40 percent of the school’s budget according to Alioto – which would place it closer to $10 million.


In related business, the board approved a resolution to move the sixth through eighth grades to the Main Street campus Tuesday night.


The board’s next meeting is April 5. It is expected the members will approve a budget for voters during its April 12 meeting.