There’s always room for improvement.


That’s the goal of the Livingston County Transportation Connectivity Plan, which aims to improve the way people get around.

There’s always room for improvement.


That’s the goal of the Livingston County Transportation Connectivity Plan, which aims to improve the way people get around.


The Plan’s objective is to “develop a countywide transportation plan that fosters partnerships and connections between government, private, nonprofit and educational agencies for the purpose of supporting and promoting a vital and sustainable Livingston County for existing and future residents and visitors alike.”


Last summer, Livingston County Planning director Angela Ellis presented the idea to the county’s public transportation quarterly review committee.


“We all agreed that the county would benefit from having this type of plan that really looks at connections, getting people to places,” she said.


On March 10, Genesee Transportation Council approved the project at a total of $118,000. Of that, $98,000 will go to consulting fees and $20,000 will come from in-kind services through Livingston County to primarily cover staffing costs.


Ellis said she would like to see the consultant help municipalities determine how to prioritize transportation investments in the future such as roads, sidewalks, bike racks, bus shelters, and others so there could ultimately be  a more efficient and cost-effective county-wide transportation network overall.


Guiding this project are principles such as: people count, place matters, maximizing existing infrastructural investments and accepting some future financial uncertainties.


While most people think of Livingston Area Transportation Services (LATS) when when it comes to advancing public transportation, the plan is to go beyond that and further the services of pedestrian and bike trails as well as to offer initiatives for volunteers when it comes to carpooling and car sharing services, as well as using shuttles, vans and other types of transportation services beyond busing.


For some of these services, the county would  seek out funding for agencies such as Office for the Aging or Catholic Charities so that they could implement some of these initiatives for their agency.


The Village of Geneseo is proposed to be the starting point for executing the connectivity plan since it is the county’s central hub.


Ellis hopes that by starting there, “we can start tying our transportation system together to help foster movement of our population between the villages for whatever purposes they might have.”


Planning for the system will begin next month, followed by grant applications in the fall. Implementation could begin in about a year and be in full swing in about two years.


“I’m excited about the project. I think the county will really benefit from having this type of project,” Ellis said, adding that once word of this got out, “I underestimated the level of interest from our stakeholders.”


A public meeting with more information and a chance to comment will take place later this year, likely in the late summer or early fall.