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The Dansville Online
  • Keshequa looks at budget impacts

  • The governor’s proposed cut for Keshequa is roughly $983,000.

    With health insurance and retirement expenditures increasing for next year, just as Dansville and Wayland-Cohocton, Aloisio said Keshequa is looking at a gap likely in excess of  $1 million, but will be solidifying that number within the next week or two.

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  • The governor’s proposed cut for Keshequa is roughly $983,000.
    With health insurance and retirement expenditures increasing for next year, just as Dansville and Wayland-Cohocton, Aloisio said Keshequa is looking at a gap likely in excess of  $1 million, but will be solidifying that number within the next week or two.
    “We’ve all been expecting some cuts, but we’re hoping it won’t be that big,” he said.
    Keshequa’s annual budget for this year is $18 million; with $13 million of it coming from the state. Roughly $4 million comes from local taxes, and about $1 million comes from interest earnings, refunds and other miscellaneous revenue.
    Keshequa has been reducing its staff for the past few years based on enrollment figures, and may cut staff next year based on both enrollment and state revenue decreases.
    The lay-offs are still “on the table,” Aloisio said.
    The board has allowed a retirement incentive to help spur cost-savings through attrition.
    Other cost-saving measures Keshequa is looking at includes taking some additional money out of its reserves – possibly as much as an extra $200,000 more than this year.
    Keshequa may also moderately raise property taxes. A two-percent tax cap for Keshequa would give the district another $80,000, but far below its needed (anticipated) $1 million.
    Again the two percent is based on a proposed state tax cap, but if the cap is not imposed this year, each district will likely be looking at an increase a little more than that.
    Aloisio mentioned that the district recently refinanced some of its debt, saving about $100,000 per year.
    In light of a possible $1 million gap, Aloisio said, “we don’t anticipate any dramatic program changes.”
    Educational and extracurricular programs should remain.
    Editor’s note
    This is part two of a two-part series addressing the impact of state and federal budget cuts on area schools. Part one, covering Wayland-Cohocton and Dansville schools ran Feb. 17.

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