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The Dansville Online
  • Let’s talk history

  • Nunda Historical Society has been hosting programs in its museum on a monthly basis since the society’s early years. The popular programs run from September through June.

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  • It started more than 20 years ago, and its turnout is still going strong.
    Nunda Historical Society has been hosting programs in its museum on a monthly basis since the society’s early years. The popular programs run from September through June.
    “The last two have been very well attended,” board member and volunteer Sue Long stated.
    For January, the society hosted a program on the Barber House, a mansion that is now in ruins in the town of Portage. The turnout was so well that the society had to turn people away.
    “We’re going to do that program again,” Joan Schumaker, society board member, said.
    The turnout for programs is not always as high, president Tom Cook said. Between weather and other community goings-on, “we usually vary between 20 and 100 now.”
    Finding people to give presentations every month may seem like a challenge, but society members often conduct programs themselves, or they have a pool to choose from through other society contacts or from attending other historic presentations.
    “But we’ve been growing a lot of them in-house recently,” Schumaker said.
    Its Feb. 8 program was just that. It was conducted by society member John Gordinier. He talked about the archeology of the area in a program titled, “Discovering the Genesee Valley through Archeology.”
    Gordinier is a collector of projectile points, more commonly  referred to as “arrowheads.” He used his collection as part of his presentation.
    Musicians have also given concerts as part of the society’s presentations. The concerts usually have a historic theme such as its instruments or its musical style.
    In November, the Society’s programs are usually veteran-based. Last November was, “Heroes in the Attic,” a program presented by Dennis Bielewicz, who discovered a secret trove of documents relating to the Civil War exploits of two Livingston County men.
    “Some of our programs, we need grants to cover, and we get support from the Gensee Valley Council on the Arts on a fairly regular basis,” Schumaker said.
    In spite of its need to cover costs, admission to programs are free. Donations are accepted.
    Next month’s program on March 18 will highlight the 100th anniversary of Bell Memorial Library, to be presented by George Lucas of Nunda.

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