I was watching the news the other day and there it was, the obligatory “war on Christmas” story.

I was watching the news the other day and there it was, the obligatory “war on Christmas” story.


In full disclosure, I was raised in a Christian home, so Christmas was a big deal growing up. As an adult, I choose not to celebrate religious holidays for personal reasons.


But that doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate a friendly “Merry Christmas” greeting from those I meet. Whether it’s “Merry Christmas,” “Happy Hanukkah,” “Happy New Year” or the all-inclusive “Happy Holidays,” I take the greeting as a gesture of good will toward me and my family.


As I watch news agencies roll out the tired “war on Christmas” tickers, I’m bothered that some of our neighbors can’t take these greetings for what they are: well wishes. To borrow from the Christmas hymn, this is supposed to be a time of peace on earth and good will toward men.


For a season of charity and giving, there seem to be some very tender feelings out there.


No particular group owns the season, so we should not be offended when people greet us with their version of a holiday greeting and we should return the good will. Getting offended about it is antithetical to the whole spirit of the season.


Somehow that concept of charity and good will gets lost when we start debating whether there should be a Nativity at City Hall or how to accumulate pagans, atheists and other groups without hurting anyone’s feelings.


No matter how you celebrate this time of year, do it well. And by all means, spread the cheer around.