A little more than 20 people gathered in the Nunda Historical Society Museum Aug. 13 to take part in the annual Nunda Area Homecoming. The roughly four and a half hour program began with an informal gathering inside the Museum at 1 p.m., then Historical Society President and retired Keshequa History teacher Tom Cook gave a presentation on resources available for geneological research.

A little more than 20 people gathered in the Nunda Historical Society Museum Aug. 13 to take part in the annual Nunda Area Homecoming. The roughly four and a half hour program began with an informal gathering inside the Museum at 1 p.m., then Historical Society President and retired Keshequa History teacher Tom Cook gave a presentation on resources available for geneological research.


Although Cook is retired, teaching is still a passion, evidenced more in his two later presentations, both in observance of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War and its impact on Nunda and Portage.


The first was a power-point lecture that detailed the Nunda area on the eve of the war, the mustering of local boys in the town square; and then onto the various ways in which men served during the war, plus the support from the local homefront. Cook also spoke of post-war Nunda, such as the formation of the Grand Army of the Republic and Sons of Union Veteran posts, plus what became of some of the veterans after having returned home.


Cook’s second presentation on the topic was a tour of Oakwood Cemetery to visit the graves of Civil War veterans, among others, as an extention of the Civil War talk. The group visited roughly three dozen graves, laid flowers on several of them, plus placed flags and veteran markers on a few that either needed replacing, or never had markers and flags.


“I loved it,”?Karen Robinson commented.


She, along with her husband Jim, live in Woodbury, Conn. and happened to be in the Buffalo area visiting friends that week. Jim has relatives buried in Oakwood. One of them, Rufus Robinson, was a Civil War veteran. Ralph Robinson, a World War I veteran, is also buried there, and did not have a veteran marker or flag until they placed one on his grave that day.


Jim grew up in Manhattan, and came to Wyoming, N.Y. twice a year to visit his grandmother. Being interested in family history, Jim had visited the graves with his father a number of years ago, and now, “I?wanted to get back up here and see it again, see what shape it was in.”  


Another Nunda Area Homecoming is scheduled for the second weekend of August next year.