In an effort to close a $2.6 million budget gap for next school year, some current Wayland Elementary students, and maybe even a teacher or two, could start attending the Cohocton Elementary School.


Wayland-Cohocton Central School District is looking at closing that gap with, among other plans, employee layoffs and attrition, a savings of $1,165,279 under the current proposal.


Employee cuts would be based on seniority.

In an effort to close a $2.6 million budget gap for next school year, some current Wayland Elementary students, and maybe even a teacher or two, could start attending the Cohocton Elementary School.


Wayland-Cohocton Central School District is looking at closing that gap with, among other plans, employee layoffs and attrition, a savings of $1,165,279 under the current proposal.


Employee cuts would be based on seniority.


The district would rezone by moving the Cohocton boundary north, but by how much is yet to be determined.


By rezoning students, it would allow for teacher layoffs while not creating large class sizes to make up for that.


The elementary schools currently have a total of 30 classes in grades K-4 with an average class size of 17 students. With the current rezoning plan­, the number of classes would change to 25, and the average number of students per class would change to 20.


In addition, superintendent Michael Wetherbee is proposing cuts to the athletic department, which would save the district another $60,000.


Wetherbee said Tuesday that the athletic department is looking at how to make those cuts without eliminating student athletic opportunities.


The district is also looking at utilizing a one-time Federally funded stimulus gift of $564,000; plus using $819,000 from its reserves. Adding in the Payment In Lieu Of Tax monies from First Wind and Gunlocke, and the district’s gap has lessened to $334,000, which is not a fixed number at this point, Wetherbee said.


He hopes to propose a final budget for the board to approve during its April 11 meeting.