After almost 35 years as a family physician for Tri-County Family Medicine in Canaseraga, and an active medical staff member for Noyes Memorial Hospital, Dr. Thomas Dwyer will be hanging his white lab coat at Tri-County for the last time on Oct. 29.


A Rhode Island native, Dwyer went to medical school in Buffalo, where he met his wife, Donna.


After spending a month at Tri-County’s office in Cohocton as a resident doctor under?Paul Frame (see sidebar), Dwyer was encouraged to pursue a soon-to-be open position in the Canaseraga office, which David Breen had been occupying.

After almost 35 years as a family physician for Tri-County Family Medicine in Canaseraga, and an active medical staff member for Noyes Memorial Hospital, Dr. Thomas Dwyer will be hanging his white lab coat at Tri-County for the last time on Oct. 29.


A Rhode Island native, Dwyer went to medical school in Buffalo, where he met his wife, Donna.


After spending a month at Tri-County’s office in Cohocton as a resident doctor under?Paul Frame (see sidebar), Dwyer was encouraged to pursue a soon-to-be open position in the Canaseraga office, which David Breen had been occupying.


Dwyer took the position in 1976, and has been there ever since. At that time, the office was located in a storefront, and in 1980, Tri-County built its own office on North Church Street.


After about 10 years, Dwyer gained a Physician’s Assistant, and has been assisted by three PAs throughout his career. His most recent PA, Bridget Quibell, will be transferring to Tri- County’s Dansville office Nov. 1.


Taking the place of Dwyer will be Nunda native Dr. Jacob Tallman.


In addition to the changes in staff, Noyes Memorial Hospital will be taking over the ownership of the Canaseraga building Nov. 1.


Dwyer isn’t the only one in his family to pursue the medical field, though. His daughter, Cheri Cranston, is also a doctor who worked with him for almost three years. She is now at Rochester General Hospital, and is about halfway through her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology.


His wife, Donna, is  active at Noyes Memorial Hospital, serving as a volunteer manager for The Spice Box Gift Shop and Coffee Bar.


Dr. Dwyer is involved at Noyes as well, serving on its board of directors and chairs the patient care committee.


Regarding his retirement, Dwyer said that the satisfaction and sense of accomplishment of having provided medical care to the area is matched by friendship and gratitude for a community that has supported him and welcomed him more than 30 years ago.  


Dwyer also said that he is grateful to have had the opportunity to work with and take care of “some really special people” in the community.


He also commended his replacement, who grew up in the area, and served with Dwyer as a medical student about five years ago, and said that he was glad to see someone coming to the practice whom he feels will continue that tradition.


In his retirement, Dwyer is intending to spend some time with his grandchildren in Montana and California. He also plans on continuing his interests in gardening, building things out of stone and installing alternative energy systems at his home.


But Dwyer isn’t intending to go too far from the medical field. He is planning on taking a six-month course in acupuncture.


Dwyer hopes to start an integrated (mix of conventional and alternative medicines) health center in Dansville where he would practice acupuncture and give patient consultations. When things move forward at the Castle, he would practice from there, and serve as its medical director.


Dwyer also plans on still being active on Noyes’ board of directors and its committees, as well as serving on its courtesy staff. He also mentioned that he plans on being supportive to his wife’s volunteer efforts at the hospital as well.


(Contact Jeff Miller at 585-335-2271 or jeffmiller@dansvilleonline.com).