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The Dansville Online
  • Business Education Alliance bestows honors at annual breakfast

  • Livingston County Jail’s school program; a Junior Achievement volunteer for Dalton Elementary, plus Geneseo Central School’s distance learning program received special recognition during this year’s breakfast in Geneseo on March 2.

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  • Honoring those who help facilitate the advancement of career training and opportunities for students in Livingston County is the premise of Business Education Alliance’s annual breakfasts.
    Livingston County Jail’s school program; a Junior Achievement volunteer for Dalton Elementary, plus Geneseo Central School’s distance learning program received special recognition during this year’s breakfast in Geneseo on March 2.
    BEA?executive director Carrie Malone spoke first about the jail program, which earned the alliance’s George Traber Schoolhouse Award this year.
    “Although an alternate educational site, much good in the arena of education happens within the confines of the two room school which services some of the neediest of students in our community,”  she said.
    The jail program works to help incarcerated school age children keep up with their schoolwork, plus conducts a General Education Diploma (GED) class, and teaches students the soft skills necessary in the work force.
    Malone stated that with the completion of the new jail a little more than a year ago, students are provided with state of the art classrooms, laptop computers, smart boards and other pieces of modern equipment that allow them a better opportunity to become productive members of society.
    She said the jail program, “is most definitely an outstanding example of what dedicated and caring professionals can do and how we in Livingston County are dedicated to the betterment of all our youth.”
    Sheriff John York took the podium to say a few words and thank the staff who make the jail’s education program a success.
    He said that hundreds have graduated from there with a GED, and some have gone onto college and have made a lifestyle change. He added that the program partnership with BOCES?has had a part to play in the educational and lifestyle change of inmates as well.
    Darci Dembriski, BEA?program assistant, then introduced guest speakers Klaas DeWaard, Junior Achievement volunteer, and Meg Galton, 5th?grade teacher at Dalton Elementary School. DeWaard has volunteered in her classroom for the past several years.
    “For me, as an educator, it makes my work so much easier,” Galton said of the Junior Achievement program. “Everything is kind of tied together, and it helps reinforce what they need to know to move on and be successful.”
    DeWaard said that living in a small community brings extra responsibilities. “All of us have to give something back,” he said.
    “It’s been a wonderful experience. The classes are ready for me, the kids are wonderful,” he said. DeWaard encouraged those in attendance to volunteer for Junior Achievement.
    Malone added after his speech that with the BEA running an average of 13 programs with one-and-a-half staff, “our volunteers are key to what we do.”
    Page 2 of 2 - There are more than 60 Junior Achievement classes in Livingston County, including one in the Livingston County Jail. Volunteers in attendance stood and were given an applause.
    The final presentation was to highlight the latest district partnering with BEA in long-distance learning.
    John Holt, Geneseo Central’s technology coordinator spoke about the district’s long-distance learning program, which allows students the opportunity to take field trips without leaving the classroom. BEA?funds the in-classroom field trip.
    Holt said that through long-distance technology, students recently had the opportunity to connect with U.S. Space Academy in St. Louis, with a university to show students how to develop video games, and to Ohio State Medical Center to show students an autopsy.

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