The various holidays, whether it might be Christmas, Valentine’s Day or the Fourth of July resurrects fond memories of family and friends or special events that occurred around those holidays. The memories are not always happy. Most people recall where they were and what they were doing when the news was heard about President Kennedy’s assassination or the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The various holidays, whether it might be Christmas, Valentine’s Day or the Fourth of July resurrects fond memories of family and friends or special events that occurred around those holidays. The memories are not always happy. Most people recall where they were and what they were doing when the news was heard about President Kennedy’s assassination or the attack on Pearl Harbor.


As an 8-year-old, my memory of Dec. 23, 1938, was a sad Christmas for us. The residents of the village of Perkinsville were stunned to learn of the car accident on the Dansville hill that took the lives of two young men from here, George Bricks and Jake Bill, and injured the two passengers, Howard Weiand and Stanley Didas. Naturally, those families were devastated. Howard walked away with scratches, my brother, Stanley, had a severe broken leg that laid him up in traction for months. When he came home, a bed was set up in the living room with the traction trapeze.


Many families have faced that same kind of news when that officer at the door informs the family of the death of their son or daughter in our never-ending wars.


Memories serve a very important purpose. Often as people age they resurrect memories of their childhood and the people from their past; that is not a bad thing. Our history and genealogy research often depends on the memories of older residents. As happens so often, we don’t listen carefully when those stories are being told or we don’t ask the right questions to get that essential information. We all have memories: the old swimming hole, our first prom, the first car, or that scary ride at the carnival.


Social news


Congratulations to Jerry and Linda Westacott, who celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Dec. 17 with their family on Sunday, Dec. 19. They were delightfully surprised when their church family at St. Peter’s Church surprised them with a beautiful cake and celebrated with them.


Rodney and Dinah Belanger are spending the holidays with their daughter, Dr. Nichole Belanger, and her husband, Mike Hays, in Burlington, Vt., and the Belanger’s son, Sean, his wife, Gretchen, and their children from Saratoga joined them in Vermont on Sunday.


Bob and Joan Finley from Salt Lake City, Utah, spent Christmas with her mother, Viola Bricks, and brother, Jerry and Sharon Bricks and children. The Finley’s daughter, Stephanie, and husband, David Klein, and children from Milwaukee, Wis., arrived this week to join the festivities with the family.


The 50-week lottery is a fundraiser for the Perkinsville Fire Company. There are a few tickets available. If your’re interested in purchasing one for $35 call Barb Huber, 585-728-2707. The ticket entitles you to weekly drawings plus five $200 drawings in July when you attend a chicken barbecue and again five drawings in December.


Sympathy is extended to the family of Anna (Wolfanger) Weiand who passed away Wednesday, Dec. 22, at her home after a long illness. Anna and her late husband, Bill, were good friends of ours. We shared many good times together and ended up neighbors as well. Her funeral of Christian burial was celebrated Monday morning at Sacred Heart Church.


Happy Birthday to Nellie White, Jan. 4; and Marian Clark, Jan. 6.


Well folks, we are coming to the end of another year. It was good for some and not so for others. My wish is that each and every one of you have a Happy, Healthy New Year.