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The Dansville Online
  • Q&A with Keshequa senior basketball captain Nick Faulds

  • Keshequa’s two-year captain 6-foot-2 senior Nick Faulds is an inspiration on the court to his teammates and off the court with his classmates. He’s open about his lifelong struggle with Asperger’s syndrome, a developmental disorder similar to autism that often affects interpersonal skills and coordination...
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  • Keshequa’s two-year captain 6-foot-2 senior Nick Faulds is an inspiration on the court to his teammates and off the court with his classmates. He’s open about his lifelong struggle with Asperger’s syndrome, a developmental disorder similar to autism that often affects interpersonal skills and coordination. We had a chance to sit down with Nick, who is not only one of the Indians’ top players, but also an honor roll student. We were joined by Todd Isaman, who is both Nick’s basketball coach as well as a friend and and mentor on and off the court. Nick is a senior at Keshequa Central School. He has lived his entire life in the Nunda area. He now lives in Tuscarora with his parents, Sam and Lisa; and three siblings, Adam, Samantha and Luke.
    Genesee Country Express What is a typical training regimen for you?
    Nick Faulds During the summer, I wake up between 7 and 7:30 a.m., ride my bike a half-hour from Tuscarora to school and then I lift weights from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Then I work on ball handling, driving and post drills. I used to make sure I got real tired and then I would shoot hoops for hours. And I shot a lot of them.
    Coach Todd Isaman He used to play pick-up games all afternoon. In the last two years, we’ve worked on making his morning workouts more intense.
    Nick Now I spend no more than 1½ hours playing with 1½-2 hours lifting and intense training.
     
    Express When did you develop your interest in basketball?
    Nick I just started playing in eighth grade. At first I was not good. But I said to myself, ‘I’m sick of playing like this.’ I decided to work hard and began improving in the modifieds.
    Isaman Nick has grown a lot since we first met in fifth or sixth grade elementary PE. He was running around crazy and very disrespectful at times. He’s come so far. You wouldn’t believe he was the same kid. Nick used to say, ‘I can’t do it because I’m autistic.’ But he doesn’t use it as a crutch anymore. He has used basketball as a tool to overcome those things.
     
    Express What is the biggest challenge of being a team captain?
    Nick I have a lot more responsibilities. It shows me I’m a leader. It’s good to know I’m a leader and a role model to people on the team.
     
    Express Off the basketball court what are your interests?
    Page 2 of 2 - Nick I run track in the spring. I’m a high jumper I think it’s going to be a good year for me in basketball and track.
     
    Express What are your plans after high school?
    Nick I plan to go to Genesee Community College next year and hope to be a students assistsnt coach and practice player. I want to study adaptive physical education. (Nick explained a normal physical education degree isn’t as marketable and an adaptive PE degree will give him specialized skills to help students with special needs.)

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