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The Dansville Online
  • Rabid cat found in York

  • According to Joan H. Ellison, public health director of the Livingston County Department of Health, the New York State Department of Health Rabies Laboratory has reported that a Livingston County cat has tested positive for rabies. The cat, considered feral (wild), was found near state Highway 36 in the town of York. It ap...
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  • According to Joan H. Ellison, public health director of the Livingston County Department of Health, the New York State Department of Health Rabies Laboratory has reported that a Livingston County cat has tested positive for rabies. The cat, considered feral (wild), was found near state Highway 36 in the town of York. It appeared to be in ill health and was rescued by an individual, who then took it to a veterinarian for treatment.
    The cat died at the veterinarian’s office, and because of exposures that had occurred to humans, it was decided the cat should be tested for rabies. Evidence of rabies in the cat was reported to LCDOH on Nov. 14. As a result of the laboratory testing, three individuals are undergoing treatment to prevent on-set of rabies virus.
    Feral cats create a potential for exposure to rabies that does not exist in other animals that are known to possibly have rabies. Feral cats can look and act just like a pet cat but they are wild animals and are unpredictable. They can bite at any time. The following tips will help prevent rabies and potential rabies exposure.
    • A cat with rabies may not exhibit the typical symptoms of rabies. It may be aggressive, but it may also be acting very passive. Just because a cat looks harmless and is cute does not mean it is not rabid.
    • Livingston County is very rural, with populations of bats and raccoons that have rabies. Most cats, even domesticated ones, are hunters by nature and can come into contact with a bat or raccoon, and no one will ever know. All pet cats are required to be vaccinated against rabies.
    • Teach children to stay away from unfamiliar animals, either wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly.
    • Wash any wound from an animal thoroughly with soap and water, and seek medical attention immediately. Additionally, the LCDOH must then be notified of any exposure incident.
    • Be a responsible pet owner by keeping your pet’s vaccinations current. Getting your pets vaccinated can help stop the spread of rabies from wild animals to humans.
    It is important to be aware of the facts and use caution to protect both your family and your pets. If you have any questions or would like further information on rabies, or rabies vaccination requirements, please contact the Livingston County Department of Health at 585-243-7280 or 585-335-1717.
     

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