October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month, and when this reporter was asked to interview a survivor, he didn’t have to look any further than his own office.


That’s because Patty Davy, the person who greets people and answers phones for The Express and Pennysaver is a breast cancer survivor. Her battle began Jan. 20, 1997.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month, and when this reporter was asked to interview a survivor, he didn’t have to look any further than his own office.


That’s because Patty Davy, the person who greets people and answers phones for The Express and Pennysaver is a breast cancer survivor. Her battle began Jan. 20, 1997.


When Davy began feeling some symptoms that she thought were related to seatbelt injuries from a car accident two to three months prior, she almost brushed it off as nothing. But her doctor, sent her to see Wende Logan-Young, who then decided to send her to the Elizabeth Wende Breast Clinic in Rochester that afternoon for tests.


This was her first mammogram, she said, and as a result, a small lump was found. A couple of weeks later, Davy underwent a lumpectomy at Noyes.  


For the next three years, Davy had to go to the breast clinic once every three months for more tests.


“That was hard,” she said about going. But, “they’re very supportive,” she added about the people at the clinic.


For the fourth year, she went for tests twice, and for nearly a decade, has gone annually.


Regardless of having had cancer, Davy said it’s important that she gets checked every year, and said that “every woman should go every year, over the age of 40.”


Davy knows firsthand how difficult it can be for women without insurance to have mammograms. She went for three years without insurance, but with the help of Livingston/Wyoming Cancer Services Partnership, she was able to obtain mammograms for free.


Davy mentioned that there are other programs available for women to get a mammogram who do not have insurance.


“I?strongly, strongly urge any woman to get mammograms,”?she said. Having found the cancer early, “that was the key,” she said. If she had brushed it off like she almost had, then she would have had to go through a lot more treatment, Davy said.


But because she did not have to endure as much as many other woman have, Davy admitted that when she participates in events such as the annual Relay For Life in Dansville and Geneseo, as well as the Susan G. Koman For a Cure walk in 1999, and meet women who have gone through much more, “I feel almost like a fraud.”


The youngest of 16 children (10 girls), Davy is the first in her family to have battled this particular type of cancer.


(Contact Jeff Miller at 585-335-2271 or jeffmiller@dansvilleonline.com.)