Empire State Development (ESD) and I LOVE NY, New York State's Division of Tourism, are encouraging residents and visitors to experience hundreds of events scheduled for the Path Through History Weekend, scheduled for Oct. 6-8.

I LOVE NY will continue to highlight Path Through History Weekend events on its website, social media platforms, and the award-winning I LOVE NY app.

ESD President, CEO and Commissioner Howard Zemsky said, "With hundreds of years of rich history, New York State has been instrumental in many of the events and ideals that helped to shape America. I would encourage everyone to plan a trip to experience the culture of our Path Through History attractions."

Introduced by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo in 2012, the Path Through History initiative uses 13 themes to organize more than 700 heritage sites across the state, including an unparalleled network of museums, historic sites and cultural institutions. Path Through History Weekend showcases the state's rich heritage and will feature hundreds of events at historic and cultural destinations statewide. The first 2018 Path Through History Weekend was held in June to coincide with Father's Day and featured more than 500 events statewide.

New York State Executive Director of Tourism Ross D. Levi said, "Fall is already an amazing time to explore New York, and the opportunity to experience hundreds of events at historical sites across the state is icing on the cake. Whether your interest is the American Revolution, colonial history, civil rights or one of our other Path Through History themes, there is an event to form the cornerstone of a great holiday weekend New York getaway for you and your family."

Notable Columbus Day Path Through History Weekend events from New York’s 11 vacation regions include:

The Adirondacks

Fort Ticonderoga (Ticonderoga) is commemorating the Campaign of 1781, when the Royal Navy and British soldiers pushed south from Canada. They anchored and encamped at Ticonderoga, holding this strategic strait as raids continued southward. Fort Ticonderoga will focus on the sailors of the Royal Navy and the soldiers of the 29th Foot who worked closely together to propagate British power and politics.

Capital–Saratoga

At Johnson Hall State Historic Site (Johnstown), visitors will travel back in time to the 18th century and learn what it took to hunt, harvest and preserve enough food to last through the cold, harsh winters. Period-specific hunting and harvesting equipment will be on display, with interpreters providing demonstrations.

The Catskills

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts (Bethel) is hosting Legends in the Sky, a stargazing party. At this family friendly event, attendees can hear stories about the stars, learn astronomy facts, and create their own constellations from family myths and hopes for the future.

Central New York

The Northeast Classic Car Museum (Norwich) features more than 170 vehicles, featuring New York State-made cars like the Chenango Camper from Norwich, and Franklin Automobiles, made in Syracuse from 1906-1934. On October 7, the museum will host a LEGO car building contest for kids ages 3-18. Participating children will receive FREE admission to the museum when they bring in their assembled LEGO cars for display.

Chautauqua–Allegheny

Johnson Estate Vineyards (Westfield) invites visitors to experience New York's picturesque fall foliage and learn about winemaking. The walking tour explores the history of wine in New York State against the backdrop of the hillsides in their colorful autumn foliage.

Finger Lakes

Phelps Mansion (Binghamton) was built during America's Gilded Age as part of the city's "Mansion Row." The home, once part of a neighborhood full of beautiful homes, is the last of its neighbors and open for tours. It was designed by Isaac G. Perry, one of the state’s most famous 19th century architects, known for his work on the New York State Capitol.

Greater Niagara

Cobblestone Museum (Albion) will host its second annual Ghost Walk. Tour guides will lead you on a walking tour of 10 different National Historic Landmarks on the Museum's campus, including the oldest cobblestone church in North America. Along the way, guests will "meet" apparitions of notables like Horace Greeley, George Pullman and Grace Bedell.

Hudson Valley

The FASNY Museum of Firefighting (Hudson) is hosting Dalmatian Day. The annual Bob McKinney Memorial Fire Prevention Event will feature live Dalmatians as part of the day's activities to teach children about fire safety.

Long Island

Rise of the Jack O'Lanterns (Old Westbury) will feature thousands of illuminated jack o'lanterns at Historic Old Westbury Gardens. Organizers are doubling the number of carved pumpkins over 100 pounds, each one requiring more than 10 hours to carve to perfection. Multi-pumpkin structures, consisting of dozens of illuminated jack o’lanterns, are assembled into life-sized pieces of art include dinosaurs, dragons and animals.

New York City

The Flushing Friends' Meetinghouse (Queens), the oldest house of worship in New York which dates back more than 300 years, is hosting tours and an open house. It is associated with the 1657 Flushing Remonstrance, a protest movement to resist persecution of religious minorities by Dutch Governor, Peter Stuyvesant. It eventually led to the precedent for the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Thousand Islands–Seaway

Starr Clark Tin Shop (Mexico) was once owned by Starr Clark and his wife, Harriet Loomis Clark, who were abolitionists and Underground Railroad activists. Visitors can tour the home and learn more about the couple who, from late 1832 until the Civil War, welcomed freedom seekers by offering housing for them and providing transportation to the next station.

Since 2011, New York State has made unprecedented investments in the tourism industry statewide, leading to historic levels of visitors and direct spending. Last year, New York welcomed a record 243.8 million visitors who spent $67.6 billion, generating a total economic impact of more than $100 billion for the fourth straight year. Tourism is now the state's third largest employer, supporting 938,800 jobs annually.